1835 Oak Haven Plantation RD, Osteen, Central Florida 32764-8872

bestpaw@bestpaw.com (407) 321-1006

Gentle, effective, family-oriented methods Experienced instructors

Events

EXTRA ORIENTATION SESSION THIS WEEK: 7:30 P.M. TUES. MAY 19 IN OSTEEN

EXTRA ORIENTATION SESSION THIS WEEK: 7:30 P.M. TUES. MAY 19 IN OSTEEN

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Monday 7 p.m. PuppyLove class is back!


Also watch for details to come on our new beginner agility program starting soon! Learn easy ways to add important fitness components into your daily routine and training sessions

Reinforce behaviors from manners or competition classes

When to use lures, when to let them go

Improve your own and your dog's timing, speed, communication

Better scores, more wins in show,  agility, obedience, rally etc. -  an agile dog can handle all kinds of challenges 


Osteen fresh-air small sessions continue

No group classes in DeLand for now

Work study options & barter opportunities, always available  at Osteen site, continue during this time of social distancing , as they have been since Best Paw Forward Inc. began decades ago. 

Most of your small-group tuition fee can be paid through your time and skills. Join our inclusive program, using reasonable safe measures.


https://bestpaw.com/discount-opportunities 


Rainy day when you are scheduled for classes in Osteen? 

Covered training barn or under covered pavilion 


More Best Paw Forward Inc.  details on other programs continue below the latest AVMA announcement that follows



 

  


EXTRA ORIENTATION SESSION THIS WEEK: 7:30 P.M. TUES. MAY 19 IN OSTEEN

EXTRA ORIENTATION SESSION THIS WEEK: 7:30 P.M. TUES. MAY 19 IN OSTEEN

EXTRA ORIENTATION SESSION THIS WEEK: 7:30 P.M. TUES. MAY 19 IN OSTEEN

VISITORS DURING CLASSES MUST MAINTAIN SOCIAL DISTANCE GUIDELINES


We found this information helpful and reassuring for pet owners:

From the American Veterinary Medical Association

What veterinarians need to know

 

Updated as of 6 p.m. on April 5, 2020

Health officials across the U.S. and all over the world are working hard to combat COVID-19. Veterinary professionals are receiving questions from their clients and their teams, and the AVMA is pleased to be able to provide credible information and resources to assist with responses to those questions.

To ensure the resources we provide you are as accurate and up-to-date as possible in this continuously evolving environment, the AVMA is in regular contact with CDC, FDA, and USDA; other state, national, and international veterinary and public health expert groups; and intergovernmental organizations (such as the WHO and OIE) to learn the latest developments and their potential impacts on veterinarians, patients, and clients.

Here’s some key information about COVID-19:

  • The betacoronavirus that causes COVID-19 is SARS-CoV-2 (formerly 2019-nCoV).
  • Person-to-person and community spread has been reported in numerous countries, including the United States.
  • Transmission primarily occurs when there is contact with an infected person's bodily secretions, such as saliva or mucus droplets in a cough or sneeze. People are thought to be the most contagious when they are most symptomatic. Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; however, this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. Transmission via touching a contaminated surface or object (i.e., a fomite) and then touching the mouth, nose, or possibly eyes is also possible, but appears to be a secondary route. Smooth (non-porous) surfaces (e.g., countertops, door knobs) transmit viruses better than porous materials (e.g., paper money, pet fur) because porous, especially fibrous, materials absorb and trap the pathogen (virus), making it harder to contract through simple touch. At this time, there is no evidence that the virus that causes COVID-19 can spread to people from the skin or fur of pets.
  • There are currently no antiviral drugs recommended or licensed by FDA to treat COVID-19, and there is no immunization available.
  • Cases of COVID-19 and community spread are being reported in most states. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.
  • The best way to avoid becoming ill is to avoid exposure to the virus. Taking typical preventive actions is key.
  • While two dogs (Hong Kong) and two cats (one in Belgium and one in Hong Kong) living with people diagnosed with COVID-19 have been reported to have been infected with SARS-CoV-2, other dogs and cats also living with infected people remain uninfected. New research articles have been posted to open-access sites on an almost daily basis that describe preliminary results suggesting some domestic animals can be experimentally infected with SARS-CoV-2 and may transmit the virus to other animals in an experimental setting or mount a viral-specific immune response when exposed to SARS-CoV-2. However, caution should be taken to not overinterpret results described in such articles, some of which may report on data from a very small number of animals or provide only preliminary results, and not extrapolate those results to the potential for SARS-CoV-2 to naturally infect or be transmitted by companion animals kept as pets. To date the CDC has not received any reports of pets becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States. Infectious disease experts and multiple international and domestic human and animal health organizations continue to agree there is no evidence at this point to indicate that, under natural conditions, pets spread COVID-19 to people.
  • The USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratories has also confirmed the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in one tiger at a zoo in New York. This is the first instance of a tiger being infected with COVID-19. Several lions and tigers at the zoo showed clinical signs of respiratory illness and this tiger was tested accordingly. Public health employees believe the large cats became ill after being exposed to a zoo employee who was actively shedding virus. All of the large cats are expected to recover. No other animals in other areas of the zoo are exhibiting similar clinical signs. USDA and CDC are monitoring this situation and the OIE will be notified of the finding.
  • If you are not ill with COVID-19, you can interact with your animals as you normally would, including feeding and otherwise caring for them. You should continue to practice good hygiene during those interactions (e.g., wash hands before and after interacting with your animals, including handling of food, supplies, and waste; keep feed, water, and any supplies used to deliver them clean; remove soiled bedding and replace as appropriate).
  • Out of an abundance of caution and until more is known about this virus, if you are ill with COVID-19 you should restrict contact with pets and other animals, just as you would restrict your contact with other people. When possible, have another member of your household or business take care of feeding and otherwise caring for any animals, including pets. If you have a service animal or you must care for your animals, including pets, wear a cloth facemask; don’t share food, kiss, or hug them; and wash your hands before and after any contact with them.
  • There have been no reports of pets or livestock becoming ill with COVID-19 in the United States. At this point in time, there is also no evidence that domestic animals, including pets and livestock, can spread COVID-19 to people.
  • As always, careful handwashing and other infection control practices can greatly reduce the chance of spreading any disease. The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians’ (NASPHV) compendium of standard precautions is a good reference for appropriate infection control in veterinary practices.


Link to AVMA article



 

Downloads

Driving to Best Paw Forward Inc during coronavirus, April 2020 pdf (pdf)

Download

Seminar, workshop or event registration form Microsoft Office or Google Document 2019 (docx)

Download

Class form PDF March 2020 (pdf)

Download

Orientation

Exciting & fun agility (lighted agility field), rally, obedience, tricks, fitness, play times, ring/fenced property rental, safe ponds for swims, all help dogs stay healthy & happy. Workshops & periodic series on scent work, conformation, tracking, common behavior issues, physical conditioning, retriever field work & much more!

Ready for a quick doggie attitude boost?

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If your dog is annoying you in many ways:

For one week or more prior to your first class, or if you find his good behavior slipping for any reason (busy schedule, sabotage from indulgent friends or family, stressful time) it is helpful to hand feed your dog for doing simple obedience tricks or new fun skills like fetch or roll over.


Dole out a few pieces at a time of high-quality dry or specialty dog food for paying attention to you in a polite way, or for learning or practicing his tricks, throughout the day & evening. 


Give him his full ration of food without using the dog food bowl. 


If you are limited in time at home due to your work hours or other responsibilities, do this just for the evening meal or whenever works for you. 


This also helps a new dog bond to you faster. Dole it out a piece at a time or a handful at a time for doing useful tricks and demonstrating better manners.